Category Archives: Giant Slalom

XXII Olympic Winter Games – Events Full Calendar

The XXII Olympic Winter Games will be held in Sochi, Russia starting next February 6th and closing on the 23rd.

Below you will find the full schedule for this Winter Olympics, as well as some relevant posts we have published about several events technical details, so you can follow all the action in a more informed way.

http://sportsworldintel.com/category/wintersports/page/5/

http://sportsworldintel.com/category/wintersports/page/4/

 February
TH6
FR7
SA8
SU9
MO10
TU11
WE12
TH13
FR14
SA15
SU16
MO17
TU18
WE19
TH20
FR21
SA22
SU23
Ceremonies
Alpine Skiing
Biathlon
Bobsleigh
Cross-Country
Curling
Figure Skating
Freestyle Skiing
Ice Hockey
Luge
Nordic Combined
Short Track
Skeleton
Ski Jumping
Snowboard
Speed Skating

Women Giant Slalom – Fenninger wins at Semmering, Austria; Tina Maze 2nd

The last 2012 Women’s Giant Slalom just ended a few moments ago in Semmering, Austria.

Alpine Skiing – ‘The Giant Slalom’

Local skier Anna Fenninger set the fastest time in Run 1 and also in the second winning with an aggregated time of 2:13:09 an impressive 1:10 seconds less than Tina Maze. With this result Fenninger moved to 4th both in the GS overall standings and in the Alpine Skiing events World Cup.

Alpine Skiing – What are its origins and in what it consists?

Tina Maze, the current World Cup Overall leader – both is GS as well as in all Alpine Skiing events – was 3rd in first run and repeated her position in Run 2 finishing second today. Tina Maze has ruled the GS till now with 4 wins, todays’ 2nd and a 3rd place in 6 events.

Women’s Giant Slalom World Cup 4 – Amazing MAZE: 4 Races, 4 Wins !

Tessa Worley of France was 3rd and Viktoria Rebensburg – the winner of the last GS in Are, Sweden – finished today’s race in 5th.

Women Giant Slalom – Maze Was Finally Beaten: Viktoria Rebensburg

Maria Hoefl-Riesch, maintained her second place in the Alpine Skiing overall World Cup ( but now with a huge 417 points disadvantage) despite finishing today only in 4th place. This result allowed her to climb from 11th to 8th in the GS overall standings.

Women Giant Slalom – Semmering Run 1: Anna Fenninger P1; Maze P3

The last Women’s Giant Slalom of 2012 is being held at Semmering, Austria.

Alpine Skiing – ‘The Giant Slalom’

Run 1 just finished a few moments ago and Local Skier Anna Fenninger  set the fastest time with 1:06:42, 0:56 tenths of a second quicker than French Lady Tessa Worley. Fenninger is currently 5th in the GS overall standings and Worley is one position ahead (4th).

Tina Maze, the current World Cup Overall leader – both is GS as well as in all Alpine Skiing events – was 3rd in this first run 0:90 tenths of a second from Fenninger. Tina Maze has ruled the GS till now with 4 wins and a 3rd place in 5 events.

Women’s Giant Slalom World Cup 4 – Amazing MAZE: 4 Races, 4 Wins !

Viktoria Rebensburg – the winner of the last GS in Are, Sweden – finished today’s run 1 in 6th place, 1:25 seconds behind Fenninger.

Women Giant Slalom – Maze Was Finally Beaten: Viktoria Rebensburg

Maria Hoefl-Riesch, currently second in the Alpine Skiing overall World Cup (almost 400 points apart from Maze) but only 11th in the GS overall finished run 1 in 4th place 1:14 seconds behind top skier.

Alpine Skiing – What are its origins and in what it consists?

Run 2 that will define the final standings in Semmering’s GS will be held today at 13:30 CET.

We will post the results as soon as the competition ends.

 

Women Giant Slalom – Maze Was Finally Beaten: Viktoria Rebensburg!

After run 2 of Women’s 5th Giant Slalom (GS) of the season, Slovenian Wonder Skier Tina Maze was finally unable to win the GS.

Women’s Giant Slalom World Cup 4 – Amazing MAZE: 4 Races, 4 Wins !

Tina Maze had won 4 out 4 GS but in the race held in Are, Sweden, Viktoria Rebensburg (Germany) was too stronger for the rest of the competition (even though Maze was faster in run 2). Rebensburg recorded an aggregated time in the 2 runs of 2:28:94, 0.62 seconds less than Austrian lady Anna Fenninger. Rebensburg climbed to 3rd in the GS overall World Cup standings and to 6th in the alpine skiing events overall classification.

Alpine Skiing – What are its origins and in what it consists?

Maze nonetheless still made it to a podium place, 0:91 seconds behind first place. With this third place, Maze has an impressive record of 8 podium finishes in 13 races of all alpine skiing events and even extended her overall World Cup lead to a 351 points advantage over other German, Maria Hoefl-Riesch that finished today’s GS in 6th place.

Alpine Skiing – ‘The Giant Slalom’

Current  Alpine Skiing World Cup holder USA’s Lindsey Vonn did not enter this Swedish round and lost her 3rd place in the overall alpine skiing to Kathrin Zettel (Austria). Zettel was only 10th today but the points she got were enough to overcome Vonn. However, she lost points to Maze in what respects the GS overall classification and is now 154 points behind the Slovenian.

The Swedish round continues tomorrow in Are, with the Women’s slalom.

Alpine Skiing – ‘The Slalom’

The last round of 2012 will be held next 28th (Women GS) and 29th (Slalom), both at Semmering, Austria.

Women’s Giant Slalom World Cup 4 – Amazing MAZE: 4 Races, 4 Wins !

Slovenian Tina Maze won the Giant Slalom that just finished a few moments ago in Courchevel, France. Her aggregated time of both runs was 2:16:84,  0.22 tenths of a second less than 2nd best.

With this win Maze has won all the 4 Giant Slalom held till now.

This week’s winter sports has been great for a small and wonderful country like Slovenia since Biathlete Jakov Fak recorded his first career win last Thursday (Biathlon Sprint Event) and a few minutes ago reached another fantastic 2nd place in the Mass Start.

Second place went to Austrian Kathrin Zettel and third to Tessa Worley (France). These 2 skiers swapped place since in Run 1 Worley did 2nd and Zettel 3rd.

Alpine Skiing – ‘The Giant Slalom’

Tina Maze is, of course, the current World Cup leader in The Giant Slalom. She also leads  the Super Combined event.

Alpine Skiing – ‘The Super Combined’

In the overall Alpine Skiing classification Tina Maze leads as well with a huge advantage ( 331 points) over second best classified Maria Höfl-Riesch from Germany that today finished the GS just in 26th.

And skiing seems not to be Maze’s only skill. She also sings and one can say very well! See video below.

Kathrin Zettel moved to 3rd overall at the cost of USA’s Lindsey Vonn and is now just 28 points apart from Maria Höfl-Riesch’s 2nd place.

Alpine Skiing – What are its origins and in what it consists?

The next Women’s Giant Slalom will be held at Åre (Sweden) next December 19th.

Men’s Giant Slalom World Cup 4 – Ted Ligety Rules!

In men’s Giant Slalom (held at Alta Badia, Italy) USA’s Ted Ligety confirmed a very expected win after his huge advantage after run 1.

Marcel Hirscher (Austria) took 2nd and Thomas Fanara 3rd (France).

Ligety is the current World Cup leader of the Giant Slalom with 3 wins and a 3rd place and now sums up 508 points in the overall Alpine Skiing World Cup (in which he is 2nd) getting closer to current leader Aksel Lund Svindal, from Norway, that was 9th today in the GS (614 points).

Alpine Skiing – What are its origins and in what it consists?

Marcel Hirscher, today’s 2nd is 3rd in the World Cup overall standings (480 points).

Ligety and Hirscher are fighting hard for the Giant slalom overall standings. Ligety has 36o points and Hirscher 320 (1 win, two 2nds and one 3rd place).

Alpine Skiing – ‘The Giant Slalom’

Next men’s Giant Slalom event will be held at Adelboden (Switzerland), January 12th.

Giant Slalom – Men and Women Final: Tina Maze and Ted Ligety Win Run 1

Slovenian Tina Maze won run 1 of Giant Slalom that just finished a few moments ago in Courchevel, France.

Maze won the 3 Giant Slalom events held till now and is preparing to take win number 4 out of 4 since she will start run 2 – to be held in today in about an hour – with 0.63 tenths of a second over Tessa Worley (France) and 0.69 less than Austrian Kathrin Zettel,

Tina Maze is the current World Cup leader in The Giant Slalom, Super Combined as well as in the overall Alpine Skiing classification.

Alpine Skiing – What are its origins and in what it consists?

In men’s Giant Slalom (being held at Alta Badia, Italy) USA’ Ted Ligety has a huge advantage after run 1: less 2.42 seconds than Marcel Hirscher (Austria) and 2.72 than Alexis Pinturault (France) and should also take the win after run 2 is complete yet this morning (CET).

Alpine Skiing – ‘The Giant Slalom’

Ligety is the current World Cup leader of the Giant Slalom with 2 wins and a 3rd place (3 events held till now). If he wins he will reinforce his leadership in the Giant Slalom and sum up 508 points in the overall Alpine Ski World Cup putting him much closer to current leader Aksel Lund Svindal, from Norway (585 points, without counting is performance in today’s GS).

Alpine Skiing – ‘The Giant Slalom’

The Giant Slalom is also known as the GS.  The GS is similar to the slalom, but with fewer, wider, and smoother turns since ski speed is higher in the GS. The course should test the skier’s ability to react and adapt to an ever-changing rhythm and radius, but allow the competitors smooth transition between the various sections of gates.

In Giant Slalom, as well as in the Downhill  and Super-G, skiers normally start at regular intervals of 60 seconds. However the minimum start interval is 30 seconds in the GS while in the Super-G and  Downhill is 40 seconds.

He have described the Super-G and the Downhill in previous posts that you can check below:

Alpine Skiing – ‘The Amazing Super-G’

Alpine Skiing – ‘The Downhill’

Unlike the Super-G and Downhill where only one run determines the winner, in the GS each skier makes two runs down two different courses on the same slope. Both runs take place on the same day, usually with the first run held in the morning and the second run in the afternoon. The times are added, and the fastest total time determines the winner.

Both in GS and Super-G gates must be alternately red and blue . However, while in the GS gates must be at least 4 m and at most 8 m wide and the distance between the nearest poles of two successive gates must not be less than 10 metres, in Super-G gates must be at least 6 m and at most 8 m wide for open gates and at least 8 m and at most 12 m for vertical gates. In the Super-G distance between the turning poles of two successive gates must be at least 25 m.

Differently from GS, in Downhill and in Super-G the course must be marked using:

– twigs stuck in the snow on the inside and/or outside of the racing line before and after the gate and/or;

– small pine needles or similar material spread on the course and/or;

– coloured dye used vertically from gate to gate as well as horizontally, across the course or the inside and/or outside of the racing line before and after the gate, notably on the approaches indicating changes in terrain and jumps.

While in downhill and Super-G the use of a helmet is mandatory, is GS that is not the case, but skiers often worn one as well as in slalom. Unlike the downhill and Super-G, in GS and in the slalom, poles are straight and often have plastic guards covering the knuckles to help skiers knock the slalom poles out of their path. GS skis are shorter than Super-G and downhill skis, and longer than slalom skis.

The GS became a World Championships event in 1950 (USA, Aspen, Colorado). The first Winter olympics event of GS was held in Norway (Oslo) in 1952. The GS has been run in every world championships and Olympics since. Alberto  of Italy is the only skier to have won twice (and consecutively, 1988, 1992) the gold in the Olympics. Curiously, the first GS course was established on Italy’s Dolomite mountains in 1935.